• Francesca Woodman
  • Francesca Woodman On Being an Angel 1 Providence Rhode Island 1977 C Betty and George Woodman
  • Francesca Woodman Untitled New York 1979 C Betty and George Woodman
  • Francesca Woodman, self portrait talking to Vince 1975-78.

Francesca Woodman: On Being an Angel

$39.95

Francesca Stern Woodman (April 3, 1958 – January 19, 1981) was an American best known for her pictures featuring either herself or female models. Many of her photographs show young women who are nude, blurred (due to movement and long times), merging with their surroundings, or whose faces are obscured. Her work continues to be the subject of much critical acclaim and attention, years after she killed herself at the age of 22, in 1981.

Francesca Stern Woodman (April 3, 1958 – January 19, 1981) was an American best known for her pictures featuring either herself or female models. Many of her photographs show young women who are nude, blurred (due to movement and long times), merging with their surroundings, or whose faces are obscured. Her work continues to be the subject of much critical acclaim and attention, years after she killed herself at the age of 22, in 1981.

Reviews

[Francesca Woodman, House #4, Providence, Rhode Island, 1976]

Unlike the photographs we take of ourselves today, whether using our computers or smartphones, and whether or not we take these images of ourselves so seriously as to consider them self-portraiture, much less any other form of art, time itself went into Francesca Woodman’s pictures — not the kind of time spent creating effects after the photograph was taken, and not in particular the time spent making magic in the darkroom, a dimension of image-making that did not interest her beyond the most straightforward processing of her negatives. The “timeless time,” to borrow a phrase from her contemporary Nico, inside Woodman’s photographs, was the time it took to select the elements for their semi-improvisatory making, plus the time it took to take them, behind which was, of course, each contour of every single thing she ever saw or did in her life, as is true for all artists. And yet the sense her photographs exude, of having captured a soul-state somehow live, like a bug in amber, is rare. It may be that making images that evoke and isolate complex inner states is itself an antique thing even to want to do.